Love and Hate for HR

I stumbled upon this infographic a couple weeks ago and debated if I should post it here.  The reason being because I feel that it reinforces some of the negative stereotypes about HR.  After thinking about it though I decided to post it because it illustrates how much work we have to do to keep showing employees and organizations the value of HR.

Take a look at some of these numbers: 30% of people think that HR is lazy! Seriously,  this is ridiculous.  Especially after the great recession have you seen a non-busy HR group? This says to me that we aren’t communicating what we do and how we add value.  What do you think?  Check out the infographic below and let me know in the comments! 

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  • Bonnie Ungaro

    While is it listed a LOVE, I’m disturbed that only 10% think HR helps with selecting winning candidates:(

    What I appreciate about HR is (we) or I have a good understanding that managers have busy work loads. So when they do not respond immediately to my inquiries I do not come to the conclusion they are lazy, I understand they are busy. I think if employees and managers shared this mentality that 30% would be much lower. HR is not lazy, we are busy but never too busy to help someone and that is why we are so busy….

    • Melissa

      Bonnie, Great insight there. It is interesting that we make excuses for others “oh they are very busy.” But when HR is busy and takes a minute to get back the response is “HR is lazy.”

      One way we can combat the “lazy” moniker is to keep in touch with people. Let them know what is going on. I.e “Sorry, I’m super busy this week can I get this for you by Friday?” This helps combat the feeling that a request has gone into a black hole.
      Thanks for commenting!

  • http://www.jeffkortes.com Jeff Kortes

    HR has never done a good job of communicating not only what it does but the value it brings to the business. This is particularly the case when dealing with senior level people. We are afraid to quantify the things like cost of retention, disengagement, etc. and then stick our neck out and really push to make a difference. If we do, and get the results we say we can, then the respect will come

    • Melissa

      Jeff, excellent point but in fairness to HR it is very difficult to quantify something like engagement or disengagement. Any CHRO would have a hard time getting that calculation past a CFO. Take a look at this article for more background: http://www.hrexaminer.com/talent-management-roi-r
      Thanks for leaving a comment.

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